MC over in Freemont sums a question writing moms get a lot: How do you feel about writing stories that involve your kids?  Is that territory you would avoid or embrace?

I’ll take “avoid” for five hundred. Parents exist to meet their child’s needs, not the other way around.

(And I would change my title here to “Parent-blog,” more accurately reflecting the growing number of dads getting into the biz. Except that far more people Google “mom blog” than “dad,” and I am trying to build constituents. Keep my crass exploitation methods in mind as I wax more-functional-than-thou.)

  • I do understand, personally and deeply, how childbirth and parenting change people at their core, and how writers need to express those feelings.
  • I also understand the force  zeitgeist plays n scoring a book deal.

I bullet these points to underscore how clearly I get that blogging about my kids (who are cuter and funnier and more brilliant than yours; I’m sorry but that’s just the truth) would be personally and professional beneficial. But these are not things we’ve created.

These are our children.

Children do not have the maturity to understand what it means to be written about. I’m talking sheer brain development, here. Not to be ignored: they (rightfully) depend on parents for survival. Until they are significantly autonomous, it is ludicrous to think that we could ask them for permission and have them do anything except try to please us.

And that’s for the parents who think to ask. It is my experience the most parents still don’t understand that children are not around for  parents to appropriate for their own benefit.

Let’s take the seminal in the field, Anne Lamont’s Operating Instructions. Well written without a doubt, great to read if you are a new parent—helping others! Good! Right?

Not for your child.

So what is so all-fire wrong about sharing darling stories about our freakishly adorable young? Let me have it, right in the comments.

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