Goals for 2019

Alle’s commercial goals for2019

Last year, I joined a number of Facebook groups starring real, publishing writers. Many were focused on commercial publications than literary, especially high-level publications such as The New York Times and The Washington Post.

I queried a few placed. Crickets. I elected to finish out 2018 per my goals – literary publications – and to start factoring in the commercial media in 2019.

First step: identify dream publications. Step Two: approach.

  • The New York Times: queried 3/17 with travel article culled from my recent Asia trip.
  • The Washington Post: Queried the Parenting section on 3/17 with a short humor essay regarding my less-than-nurturing behavior during the death of my daughter’s Guinea pigs (scuttling, gnawing creatures). Was rejected 3/19.
  • Huffington Post: Submitted the Guinea pig tale: “A Good Mama and a Decent Human Being.”
  • The Cut: A section in New York Magazine (NOT The New Yorker), very “hip.” Formerly interested only in essays, they announced on 3/18 that they now take fiction. On 3/18, sent flash fiction featuring sharks, rats, bad stew, and nunchucks. Only from my wickedly feminist imagination could this story spring.
  • Catapult: features long-form memoir (maybe 5,000 words). I have nothing for them, right now.
  • Longreads: ditto for their requirements, and ditto for my stock.
  • LitHub: Strikes a nice balance between literary and commercial. Submitted an essay, “Mouthy Ugly Genius.”

Ten Days. Ten Books: Day Nine: Jamberry.

1Jamberry
Read nightly, 2004 until they said it was “too baby.” Sigh.

Rumble and ramble in
blackberry bramble.
Billions of berries for
blackberry jamble.

Moonberry. Starberry.
Cloudberry sky.
Boomberry. Zoomberry.
Rockets shoot by

 

 

 

 

A New Video for an Old Essay

One of my favorite essays, The Brass Ring, published in Creative Nonfiction Magazine in the 1990s. The Euonia Review (I can’t pronounce that, either) re-published it in 2016.

I’m having so much fun making trailers for my new publications that I’ve moved on to fluffing the old pubs. Enjoy! But don’t forget to come back here to read the essay.

Rounding Down “Round Down”

jmwwI began “Round Down” at least a hundred years ago – okay, probably fifteen years ago – in a Hugo House class taught by Brangien Davis on writing humor. I hoped it would be a funny little piece about cheating in eighth grade. I titled it “The Rhenquist ‘B’ Incident.”

No one wanted it. No one gave me any feed back. It was “Dear Writer: NO” the whole way. I found the first traction with it when I began to go deeper, when I found the bravery to explore the weight that a family legacy of cheating had on me.

“Round Down” as it stands now visited the submission boxes of 24 magazine since I began tracking submission and rejections, three years ago. I have no idea how many rejections it faced when the sad sucker was in the form of “The Rhenquist ‘B’ Incident.”

Thanks so much to Jen at jmww for recognizing my brilliance.

 

 

Spank children harder.

Here at About Childhood, we blog about childhood. Subtitle: Answers for writers, parents, and former children. Big focus on writers, these days. (HAI-ku, HAI-ku.) Back to childhood for a moment, in a way that floors me beyond comment.

Finney
Finney

TOPEKA — A Kansas lawmaker is proposing a bill that would allow teachers, caregivers and parents to spank children hard enough to leave marks.

Rep. Gail Finney, a Democrat from Wichita, says she wants to allow up to 10 strikes of the hand and that {sic} could leave redness and bruising. The bill also would allow parents to give permission to others to spank their children.

Source: The Associated Press.

“Why Have Kids”: New book by Jessica Valenti of “Feministing”

Are babies cool?

I heard her not ten minutes ago on the NPR affiliate, KUOW Seattle. I agreed with her on so many things. Get the book.

However, in discussing a recent survey showing that parents are slightly less happy that those who do not have children, she and host Ross Reynolds left out what is usually left out these conversations, that which is the focus of this here blog:

When people have children, men and women alike are triggered around everything that did and/or did not happen to them as children.

Every parent’s greatest fear is that anything that happened to them as a child will happen to their child. This is the primary reason the first years of new parenthood are so difficult. To new parents: it really does get better.

One’s psychological improvement is not a reason to bring a child into the world. Life will present you with more than enough reasons to navel- or mind-gaze, depending on your world view. But children are one sure way to do it.