Leaving Seattle, visiting San Antonio. Go figure.

This weekend, I am signed up to go to San Antonio for a VBBC (very big book conference). Given that San Antonio was declared a State of Emergency for the virus, I was going to skip the conference. However, given that I live in Seattle, I decided: WTF. I could go to the co-op and get coughed all over. Anyway, I will be prowling the exhibition booths for small presses to which to submit my novel. All good wishes, prayers, and positive thoughts welcome!

We have passed through The Days of Awe.

The Days of Awe are the ten days between the new year, Rosh ha Shanna, and the final day of awe, Yom Kippur. Jews, so goes the law, have these ten days to make right anything from the year just ending. Then, on Yom Kippur, so-called Day of Atonement, you can stand (as I think of it) At-One-ment with God.

It is a marvelous yearly cycle that keeps me up to date with my amends and my humanity.

Graphic by the artist Noam Weiner. The Hebrew letters read: Shana Tova, meaning, “a good and sweet year.” Say it to a Jew! (Graphic by Noam Weiner. The Hebrew letters spell, “Shana Tova” a good and sweet year.)

How to travel as a writer.

Someone on Facebook asked for information about maximizing time when on a research trip for a novel. What ho!

  1. Set a time every day to FaceTime or Skype with your children.
  2. Have something else going on. For example, I practice Tai Chi. I knew that there would be a lot of parks where the Chinese community practiced in the early mornings. I made a point to be in the neighborhood park by 6am. I met so many caring locals. They told me great places to eat and insider tips about the city that your characters need to know. One also helped me figure out which neighborhood in Bangkok my main character would live in.
  3. Spend more time on your book than seeing the sights. Limit sight seeing to elements that appear in the book.
  4. Write or edit on the plane. You write; food arrives. Tea arrives. Life doesn’t get better–until your kids arrive!
  5. Use your computer rather than a notebook. On days I used my notebook, I was too exhausted to transfer my notes. Still haven’t.
  6. Go to a library. My novel is set in the mid-90s. In the 90s, no newspaper in Cambodia published on-line. I went to the library at the Hun Sen University and read bound, back issues of newspapers.

Bon Voyage!

100 Submissions as of September, 2019

tally marksSubmissions:         100

Acceptances:          2
Rejections:             69

Good Rejections:    26

Publications            1

Although I am 32 REJECTIONS shy of my goal of 100 for the year, I have somehow SUBMITTED 100 short pieces. As those pieces are reviewed, I expect to hit my goal of 100 rejections. 😀

As of this moment, I have 52 submissions out–short pieces, that is. I submitted  my novel, As Far as You Can Go Before You Have to Come Back, to seven different agents. I received a single form rejections. One. The rest: crickets. Even from the agents I knew or had a personal connection to; and those who had asked to review the complete novel as well. Chirp chirp.

Taking a critical look at my submission pages (usually, the first 30-50), I realized that in revising, I had opened the book at a chapter that was, mmmm, well, dull as a opener.

I am re-working on the  opening. And the rest of the book. I found a new editor, to give it a fresh eye. Do eyes other than my own refresh a manuscript! I expect to be approaching agents by mid- to late month.

Are we not David Sedaris?

I read a great question on Facebook, and decided to pontificate:

Have any of you solicited agents based on an essay (or essays) that you’ve published and feel would make a compelling book?

Yes. I learned:

  • essays are “harder to sell” than poetry, unless you have a massive platform such as David Sederis or Sandra Tsing Lo. 
  • You have to put together a proposal that is a cross between a nonfiction proposal and a novel proposal- – which are similar themselves, but there are differences. 
  • For example, in your query letter, the theme of the essay is more important stress (marketing! marketing!) than is the case when pitching the novel. 
  • Similar is that that the power of the writing the reason agents would chose and essayer novel, especially for a first-timer. 
  • It is best to have new essays, as well as previously published; again, unless you are “Joad Didion: Collected Essays.”
  • Small presses might take a more serious look that than what you might get from an agent/big house route.

Sorry to be so real-world disheartening. In no way should a writer cease pursuing her dream. Sometimes, something gives.