Acceptance: Who’s heard of Dale Peck?

Dale Peck is a publishing industry firebrand-genius-superhero. Famous for his eviscerating book reviews, he is the Editor-in-Cheif of what is considered the 8th-best online magazine in the country: Evergreen Review. Two days ago, I received an e-mail from Dale himself:

I just had a chance to read your stories “That Moment in Lao” and “The Great Ultimate.”  I really loved “That Moment in Lao” and I’m sorry I missed the chance to publish it, but I really loved “The Great Ultimate” and I hope it’s still available.

Thunk. That was me hitting the floor in a dead faint.

I let him know that The Great Ultimate was certainly still available. (Currently at 8 other, totally unobtainable magazines.) The thing is, I am so convinced that this offer is what the youth call a “punked” that I keep looking over my shoulder for Alan Funt and the Candid Camera crew. And if you get that cultural reference, you are as old as I am. Congratulations!.

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YTD Acceptances, and Rejections: 4 Literary Publications This Year

tally marksWhat a headline!

I have not yet mentioned that two weeks ago, my short story Let Me Feel For You was accepted by Tupelo Quarterly. Huzzah!

Let Me Feel For You is slated to publish on June 15th. The story is adapted from a chapter of the novel I wrote in the 90s that never got published. I’ve submitted the short story to more than 50 places.

Since the acceptance, I prance around with bubbles popping in my heart. The story the novel tells is so important to me. That even a bit of it is seeing the light of day fills me with wonder and faith.

The acceptance of Let Me Feel For You marks what I hope will be a sea change in my publishing. Perhaps I am moving toward acceptance (look at that word, Alle C. Hall) by those old-school, stamp-of-authority magazines.

Last year, I had a great deal of success with shorter pieces in the new, on-line magazine scene. Really good on-line magazines; but I am old-school. Electronic publication has never matched the thrill I felt sitting on the train with my first published article rubbing its newsprint onto my hands.

I don’t completely understand the disconnect. An electronic publication can reach millions more people than a print publication is able to. Actually, the best-case scenario is the journal that has both. Tupelo is one of those. Once a year, they put out a Best Of print issue, culled from their on-line publications. Perhaps that will be me.

Those bubbles can wait. Let’s pop this cork, first.

Second on the Career Front: Part the “Acceptance!”

Second great thing to happen last week: of two submissions to Eunoia Review, both were accepted. Though for the life of me, I have no idea how to pronounce Eunoia.

What Ho“Eunoia” is the shortest English word to contain all five vowels. Very arty, very arty. That said, my pieces are not arty—I write straightforward Creative Nonfiction.

There were three reasons I chose to send to Eunoia. Firstly, hubba, hubba, Eunoia takes reprints. So many literary magazines accept only previously unpublished work, it is barely worth publishing.

I have four pieces that did not get the distribution I wanted. Although all were well-published (ie: in places I was proud to be in), they published before true Internet access kicked in. Everyone should have access to writing I admire.

double happyAdditionally, it does not escape me that two publications of the same piece are better than one. Additionally, two publications at a time are better than one. Double happiness.

Reason the Final: Eunoia tries to respond within 24 hours. I am big into getting my “No” and moving on to the next probable “No” on my list. Yet, this turned sub came back “yes.” Two yesses. Did I mention Eunoia accepted both pieces? What ho.