Morning-fresh publication

A new article of mine just posted on Richard Hugo House’s blog:

Two Voice Mails, One Quadruple Murder, and A Career Begins

Hugo House asked me to write a little something in support of my class, Get Published: The Book Review.

Leonard Nimoy did not like what I wrote about his book.

“Damn you, Alle C. Hall. Damn you!”

In Novmber of 2002, I interviewed Leonard Nimoy for his book, Shekina.

How I Got That Story

Book Review Rule #1: Keep your ears open. Always.

I was working in a Jewish bookstore when a massive controversy 86’d Leonard Nimoy’s big speaking event. Such a scandal!

Rule #2: Know who’d want to publish that story.

I was on the phone to The Stranger like a hobo on a ham sandwich. Looking back, I should have tried The New York TImes first. The story went international, ultimately to be parodied on Saturday Night Live. I knew a freelancer at The Times who covered Jewish-y/city-y stuff. However, I had never written for The Times, and I had, regularly, for The Stranger. Bird in the hand vs. bigger publication? A question we will address at the upcoming workshop.

Rule #3: Know your subject.

I had years of experience with the concept of the Shekina. I knew its importance to the various slices of Jewish culture, and I knew what it meant to me.

Rule #4: Be prepared to be inspired.

I call this the “Who knew?” principle. Jews usually define Shekina as the female essence of God. During my research, however, I learned that Shekina translates literally from Hebrew as “Divine Presence.”  The Shekina of Jews was given its female essence by ancient Kabbalists (who pre-dated Madonna by centuries.)

None of the above factored into the published piece, or even into my pitch. So what? I loved learning it. It was fun talking to Leonard Nimoy, too, if you go for that sort of thing.

Rule #5: Hit your deadline and your word count.

You can ask Josie Davis over at PLOP! how I butchered Rule #5 in my recent piece on Madonna. Fortunately for me, she still wants me to review for her.

Rule #6: Write the review that the book deserves, even if it is a negative review; even if it’s about Leonard Nimoy.

Read my final piece, and see if you can tell which part Nimoy objected to. My criticisms were well-supported and the piece well-balanced. I didn’t intend to take pot-shots, but I wasn’t afraid to do my job: critique.

Rule #7: Publicize your publication.

My upcoming workshop at Richard Hugo House will cover this essential area in depth. I might slap up a post about it, if comments demonstrate the interest. HINT HINT.

Alle’s newest class: Write a book review. Get it published.

Get Published: The Book Review

Saturday, Oct. 13, 1-5PM at Richard Hugo House.

There is no reason that your book review shouldn’t be published right now, by someone other than yourself.

Participants in this 1/2-day workshop will leave understanding how today’s publishing works for them, and with a plan for submitting at least one piece. More here.

Kudos:
“When Alle spoke to my nonfiction writing class at the University of Washington, she was at once inspiring, funny, and concrete.

She arrived highly prepared and provided a map of publications, what type of material they publish, and how a writers approaches them most effectively. She had designed her presentation to draw forth student participation and used specific examples drawn from students’ experiences and needs. Her presentation was extremely valuable.”     —Carolyn McConnell, formerly Senior Editor, YES! Magazine.

Best-selling author gives thumbs’-up to Alle’s “Madonna” review

Really fun to read!

So writes Laura Fraser, whose latest travel memoir, All Over the Map, is the sequel to her 2001 New York Times bestseller, An Italian Affair.

Thanks, Laura!

(I interviewed Laura for How I Got That Story.)

Madonna is dangerous for girls.


Material Girl

Continuing from my review of “Madonna & Me” in PLOP! Review:

The 2007 report by the American Psychological Association about the sexualization of young girls by the media (discussed in my review) states that the culture of pink and princess marketed directly to girls and its “emphasis on beauty and play-sexiness can increase girls’ susceptibility to depression, eating disorders, distorted body image, and risky sexual behavior.”

Know which other subsection of girls exhibit the same susceptibility? Survivors of child sex abuse.

When children are imbued with adult sexuality, it is often imposed upon them rather than chosen by them.

The above is from the section of the APA report, yet reads like it was taken from a book I once gave the man I eventually married. That book was a manual for the parents and partners of sex abuse survivors.

As did the book I gave my now-husband, the APA report outlines the components of sexualization that distinguish it from healthy sexuality. With extraordinary similarity to the book, the APA report states:

Sexualization occurs when:

  • a person’s value comes only from his or her sexual appeal or behavior, to the exclusion  of other characteristics;
  • a person is held to a standard that equates physical attractiveness (narrowly defined) with being sexy;
  • a person is sexually objectified—that is, made into a thing for others’ sexual use, rather than seen as a person with the capacity for independent action and decision making; and/or
  • sexuality is inappropriately imposed upon a person.

All four conditions need not be present; any one is an indication of sexualization.

WWMD pencils …

Deliberately marketed infatuations with Disney princesses lead girls to equally marketed infatuations with Disney Channel’s “tween” stars such as Britney Spears, Lyndsay Lohan, and Miley Cirus. Beyond teaching girls to pine for Prince Charming, beyond teen pregnancy, beyond convincing kids that fame and excess are their birthright, beyond just being a really bad look, fluffy pinks lead to a hardened sexuality projected by children who have yet to feel their own sexual impulses.

… and bracelet.

Lyndsay’s mom, Dinah Lohan; Miley’s dad, Billy Ray Cyrus; they exploit their daughters’ sexuality. The clinical term is emotional sexual abuse.

Does this mean that when regular ol’ non-famous parents establish environments where girls are encouraged to turn otherwise healthy sexual exploration into a public act, that they are committing emotional sexual abuse?

Real-life quotes about Who’s That Girl, and for no particular reason, my interview with Leonard Nimoy.

Who is that girl?

From Makes Own Kombucha, Age 49:

“Madonna? You mean, the singer Madonna?”

From Just Married!, age 25:

“She just doesn’t seem all that relevant. I mean, it’s ok to do all that stuff (evocative twirling gesture with hands) when you are in your twenties.”

From Lemon Pasta, aged 38:

“I just got MDNA. It’s OK, but I will defend it to the death because it is Madonna.”

On May 7th, the literary magazine PLOP! Review will publish my review of the new anthology Madonna and Me: Women Writers on The Queen of Pop (Soft Skull Press, 2012).

Assigned readings:

I’m … Too Sexy for Madonna …

Actually, I have a different skill set.

Now, I don’t mean to sound as if I spent the last three decades (Mads’ career) developing the Space Station when not meditating. Of course I knew Madonna was … well, was. I read Camille Pagila. I disagreed, but never felt the need to argue. I thought that sex book was completely unnecessary. So I didn’t read it.

I jumped to review Madonna and Me: Women Writers on The Queen of Pop (Soft Skull Press, 2012). Such is the compelling contradiction she exhudes.

The review will run next week. Stay tuned. (Ha ha.)

My last review for PLOP! is here.