My Hangover Killed Lou Reed.

Gotcha with the title, didn’t I? This is not my work, but a piece I edited for jmww journal. (Title in lower-case, indicating depth and literary quality.) It’s by Richard Prins. My Hangover … is Prins’s second piece for me. Come back for his debauched rumble, Already Yesterday.

Acceptance!

I received an additional two rejections, but also the acceptance. The flash essay “Hong Kong, My Twenties” will run in the next issue of Under the Gum Tree.

Are we not David Sedaris?

I read a great question on Facebook, and decided to pontificate:

Have any of you solicited agents based on an essay (or essays) that you’ve published and feel would make a compelling book?

Yes. I learned:

  • essays are “harder to sell” than poetry, unless you have a massive platform such as David Sederis or Sandra Tsing Lo. 
  • You have to put together a proposal that is a cross between a nonfiction proposal and a novel proposal- – which are similar themselves, but there are differences. 
  • For example, in your query letter, the theme of the essay is more important stress (marketing! marketing!) than is the case when pitching the novel. 
  • Similar is that that the power of the writing the reason agents would chose and essayer novel, especially for a first-timer. 
  • It is best to have new essays, as well as previously published; again, unless you are “Joad Didion: Collected Essays.”
  • Small presses might take a more serious look that than what you might get from an agent/big house route.

Sorry to be so real-world disheartening. In no way should a writer cease pursuing her dream. Sometimes, something gives.

ScreenCraft Cinematic Short Story Contest 2019

2019-ScreenCraft-ShortStory-2000x650.jpg

Proud to announce that for the second year running, a short piece has made it to the quarter-finals of the ScreenCraft Cinematic Short Story Contest. The piece I submitted this year, The Brass Ring, is in fact an essay; but I asked prior to submitting.

No news as to when the semi-finalists will be announced. Last year, my short story, I Wanted Ten, made the semi-finals. Hope to do better this year.

Still in Asia, by the way. Thailand. Studying Chi Gong at the Nam Yang Kung Fu School in Northern Thailand, out side the little bitty, hippie town of Pai.

My body is sore and my heart misses my family so much. Other than that, things are going very well. We’ll chat soon.

Shawn McClure’s piece featured on WordPress Reader.

morechicksI wasn’t the only one who thought that JMWW Journal writer Shawn McClure did an amazing job with Sorrow for the Wings. This CNF short-short was a featured post on WordPress Reader.

If you haven’t had a chance to read Shawn’s graceful work, please take a moment to do so.

Rounding Down “Round Down”

jmwwI began “Round Down” at least a hundred years ago – okay, probably fifteen years ago – in a Hugo House class taught by Brangien Davis on writing humor. I hoped it would be a funny little piece about cheating in eighth grade. I titled it “The Rhenquist ‘B’ Incident.”

No one wanted it. No one gave me any feed back. It was “Dear Writer: NO” the whole way. I found the first traction with it when I began to go deeper, when I found the bravery to explore the weight that a family legacy of cheating had on me.

“Round Down” as it stands now visited the submission boxes of 24 magazine since I began tracking submission and rejections, three years ago. I have no idea how many rejections it faced when the sad sucker was in the form of “The Rhenquist ‘B’ Incident.”

Thanks so much to Jen at jmww for recognizing my brilliance.

 

 

New publications, March, 2016

Coming this March, The Eunoia Review will run two creative nonfiction essays, back-to-back.

carousel 2The Brass Ring originally published in Creative Nonfiction Magazine, the best journal in the field of creative nonfiction writing. I am so proud of my inclusion.

This was long before CNF went on-line. Something like 5,000 subscribers had access to The Brass Ring – which seemed awesome. At the time.

Farrah 2Are You There, Avatar? It’s Me, The 70s won the 2009 Richard Hugo New Works Competition. In addition to a prize of $500 – definitely respectable, in the world of literary prize money – Are You There, Avatar? was published on The Richard Hugo House website. For four months. Technically, it is still there, but even I can’t find it …

And I have a great respect for great writing.

I’ll let you know when the publications drop. Follow Farrah on this blog, or on Facebook, under the guise of Alle C. Hall.

In the meanwhile, check out The Eunoia Review.