By the Numbers: “A Distressing State of Purity.”

Rosie Goldstein
Goodness!

Let us first take note that the image the magazine Literary Orphans chose is far sexier than I am enjoying.

Over the past two years, my latest publication, the flash fiction piece “A Distressing Sate of Purity” was rejected thirty-one times before finding a spectacular home at Literary Orphans. One of those thirty-one rejections came from the literary magazine for which I am now a reader, Vestal Review. In May of 2017, a VR Editor Who Shall Not Be Named wrote on my rejection that “A Distressing Sate of Purity” was “an interesting story except for the ending.” Traitor!

Due to Vestal’s response, I sent “Purity” to a magazine which offered editor feedback for $4. Read below. (Some parts are redacted because they reveal critical plot points.)

Though ostensibly flash, the piece seems to be interested in telling a modern fable; that is, a piece that feel a little bit bigger, more allegorical, more omniscient in the telling. Usually flash focuses on a single concentrated moment told in detail, with an intense focus on the language, but this piece skips time and the narrative voice stays large. That style is not to my particular taste. What I prefer to capture me in flash is the language: a dense focus on the line and the energy brought about by a particular rhythm and line of tension in the prose.

I think the most interesting part of Rosie’s character is something that wasn’t quite exploded enough: she seems to want to {REDACTED}, and she figures out a situation in which she can and yet {REDACTED}. Why is that? I’d like to see that story zero in on a moment of interaction with {REDACTED} — right now it’s mostly told, and I’d like to loosen the narrative grip on the piece and see a moment of confusion or ambiguity in Rosie’s education.

I took my $4-advice to heart. And worked my ending. And kept submitting.

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“The Best of Crack the Spine” includes me.

Crack Spine

At long last! The Best of  Crack the Spine is now available!

The anthology includes my sassy flash fiction, “Dressed Left.”

It is my first inclusion in a Best Of, and it is a printed thing; an honest-to-goodness book. Goodness gracious.

 

 

 

 

Alle “All Right!” with fiction pub in “Right Hand Pointing.”

It’s up, it’s up! My newest flash fiction in the tiny but impressive RHP.

Lifeguard ChairThis image is not from the publication. I chose it to inspire you to read “The Summers of Carefully.” (Heh heh.) RHP’s format is a single scroll adventure. If you don’t want to read the rest of the issue–which I highly encourage you to do–scroll down ten pieces (including the editor’s letter) and enjoy.

The editor, F. John Sharp, said about “The Summers of Carefully”:

I really like the craftsmanship of this. And it’s sweet and feels real.

A new publication every other month–almost.

Dear everyone,

Time for ALOG (Another Letter of Gratitude):

toot hornIn tooting my horn as part of applying for two grants, I realized that since November of 2017, I have had a new literary publication almost ever other month. This schedule continues through September of 2018, what with the upcoming publication of the flash fiction “The Summers of Carefully” in Right Hand Pointing; plus an acceptance I COMPLETELY FORGOT to mention:

The short-short published last November in Crack the Spine. That whacky flash, Dressed Left, was selected by the editors for their upcoming “Best Of” anthology. That’s in a book, Ladies and Gentlemen. A book.

When “Dressed Left” published, I asked for your letters to the editor. Many of you complied. Editors love letters to the editor. I believe that those letters helped with the selection of “Dressed Left.” Many, many thanks.

Here’s a video I made for Dressed Left.