There is no reason that your essay, short fiction, or article shouldn’t be published right now, by someone other than yourself.

Reaching far beyond the personal experiences that generally comprise talks of this nature, I draw on an industry-global perspective (traditional as well as electronic) culled from interviewing agents and editors once a month, for six years (aka: Hugo InPrint Series). We will explore:

  • the new publishing reality;
  • how Web publishing/blogging/Twitter increase your chance of someone else publishing your work;
  • how to prevent Web publishing/blogging/Twitter from becoming a time-sink;
  • how to build readership for each publication, blog post to The New York Times.
  • identify the venues you want to send to;
  • how much can you earn?
  • send the manuscript, or query?
  • what’s a query?
  • (Your burning questions here.)

Participants will leave with a clear understanding of how today’s publishing works and a plan for submitting at least one piece. Participants in the multiple-meetings Director’s Cut (below) also will draft and revise one piece.

For: prose writers of any level—fiction and nonfiction.

Get Published: Your Short Pieces Find a Home (The Director’s Cut)

We will delve more deeply into the above, allowing time between each session to absorb the ideas and techniques through real-world application.

Each class will cover one aspect of the above points, and provide time for feedback and brain-storming on your submission (contact presentation and strategy) as well as the actual work submitted.  Homework involves submitting or preparing submissions.

Participants will leave with a clear understanding of how publishing can work for them, with at lease one piece ready to submit, and with a submissions plan already as active as you choose to make it.

There is no reason that your essay, short fiction, or article shouldn’t be published right now.

For: prose writers of any level—fiction and nonfiction.